NJ Theft Laws

We have gathered the following New Jersey theft laws and statutes for you.  Theft includes offenses such as shoplifting, theft of services, auto theft, and many other variations of unlawful taking of property.  The statutes provided below are meant only to serve as general information.  If you have been charged with violating one of the following laws, please contact Villani & DeLuca, P.C. at (732) 965-3350 for a free consultation.

Theft Overview

A theft offense in New Jersey can be a serious criminal matter depending on the value of the property involved.  The prosecutor has the burden of proving beyond a reasonable doubt the fair market value of the property.

Theft in New Jersey may be a second degree crime if the value of the property involved is $75,000 or more; the property is taken by extortion; the property stolen is an illegal drug in excess of one kilogram; the property stolen is health care benefits involving more than $75,000; or the property stolen is human remains.  N.J.S.A. 2C:20-2 was amended in 2013 to establish that a person acting as a fiduciary commits a crime in the second degree if the theft involves a breach of that person’s fiduciary obligations and the amount involved is $50,000 or more.

Theft in New Jersey may be a third degree crime if the value of the property involved is between $500 and $75,000; the property stolen is a firearm, motor vehicle, vessel, boat, horse, domestic companion animal or airplane; or the property is an illegal drug with value of less than $75,000 or is a quantity less than one kilogram.  Other theft offenses that are considered third degree crimes include breaching a fiduciary duty where the amount involved is less than $50,000; a threat not amounting to extortion; theft of a public record; theft of health care benefits; theft of research property; theft of a prescription blank; theft of an access device; and theft of anhydrous ammonia to manufacture methamphetamine.

Theft is a fourth degree crime in New Jersey if the value of the property involved is between $200 and $500.  Theft is a disorderly persons offense if the value of the property involved is less than $200 or the property stolen is an electronic vehicle identification system transponder.

Theft Laws in NJ:

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